News

Solicitation of Public Comments on Draft National Pain Strategy

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

National Institutes of Health

 

Solicitation of Written Comments on Draft National Pain Strategy

ACTION: Notice  https://www.federalregister.gov/a/2015-07626

SUMMARY: The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Office of Pain Policy is soliciting public comment on the draft National Pain Strategy.

 

DATES: Comments on the draft National Pain Strategy must be received no later than 5 p.m. on May 20th, 2015. This document includes objectives and plans related to key areas of pain and pain care, including professional education and training, public education and communication, service delivery and reimbursement, prevention and care, disparities, and population research. The draft National Pain Strategy reflects the work of many offices across the Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Defense, and Department of Veterans Affairs. The draft National Pain Strategy also reflects input from scientific and clinical experts and pain patient advocates.

 

ADDRESSES: The draft National Pain Strategy is available. Comments are preferred electronically and may be addressed to NPSPublicComments@NIH.gov .   Written responses should be addressed to Linda Porter, Ph.D., NINDS/NIH, 31 Center Drive, Room 8A31, Bethesda, MD 20892.

 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Contact Linda Porter, Ph.D., NINDS/NIH, 31 Center Drive, Room 8A31, Bethesda, MD 20892,  porterl@ninds.nih.gov

 

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

A core recommendation of the 2011 IOM Report: Relieving Pain in America External link is:  “The Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services should develop a comprehensive, population health-level strategy for pain prevention, treatment, management, education, reimbursement, and research that includes specific goals, actions, time frames, and resources.” The IOM report highlighted specific objectives for the strategy:

  • Describe how efforts across government agencies, including public–private partnerships, can be established, coordinated, and integrated to encourage population-focused research, education, communication, and community-wide approaches that can help reduce pain and its consequences and remediate disparities in the experience of pain among subgroups of Americans.
  • Include an agenda for developing physiological, clinical, behavioral, psychological, outcomes, and health services research and appropriate links across these domains.
  • Improve pain assessment and management programs within the service delivery and financing programs of the federal government.
  • Proceed in cooperation with the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee and the National Institutes of Health’s Pain Consortium and reach out to private-sector participants as appropriate.
  • Involve the appropriate agencies and entities.
  • Include ongoing efforts to enhance public awareness about the nature of chronic pain and the role of self-care in its management.

The Department of Health and Human Services charged the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC) with creating a comprehensive population health-level strategy to begin addressing these objectives.

 

II. Information Request

The NINDS Office of Pain Policy, on behalf of DHHS, requests input on the draft National Pain Strategy.

 

III. Potential Responders

HHS invites input from a broad range of individuals and organizations that have interests in advancing the fundamental understanding of pain and improving pain-related treatment strategies. Some examples of these organizations include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Caregivers or health system providers (e.g., physicians, physician assistants, nurses, pharmacists)
  • Researchers
  • Foundations
  • Health care, professional, and educational organizations/societies
  • Insurers and business groups
  • Medicaid- and Medicare-related organizations
  • Patients and their advocates
  • Pharmaceutical Industry
  • Public health organizations
  • State and local public health agencies

When responding, please self-identify with any of the above or other categories (include all that apply) and your name. Anonymous submissions will not be considered. Written materials submitted for consideration should not exceed 5 pages, not including appendices and supplemental documents. Responders may submit other forms of electronic materials to demonstrate or exhibit concepts of their written responses.  We request that comments be identified by section, subsection, and page number of the draft so they may be addressed accordingly. All comments received before the close of the comment period are available for viewing by the public, including any personally identifiable or confidential business information that is included in a comment.

Dated: March 25th, 2015

Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D.

Acting Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

National Institutes of Health

 

April 6, 2015

Veterans Clinic Files Nation-Wide Class Action, Challenging Delays in VA Benefits Processing

The Veterans Legal Services Clinic at Yale Law School filed a lawsuit Monday on behalf of a Marine Corps veteran and thousands of other veterans seeking to compel the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs to decide initial disability compensation appeals that have been pending more than one year. The lawsuit specifically involves cases in which veterans are facing a medical or financial hardship.Marine Corps veteran, Conley Monk, Jr., is named a plaintiff in the lawsuit, which was filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (CAVC). Mr. Monk, students from the Veterans Clinic, and Senator Richard Blumenthal ’79 held a press conference on Monday to announce the lawsuit and detail how these long delays can have harmful impacts on the lives of many veterans around the country.Today, hundreds of thousands of veterans await a decision from the U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA) on their applications for disability benefits arising from service-connected injuries, according to the lawsuit. Delays are endemic in the VA system, but according to VA’s statistics, the greatest delays of all involve initial administrative appeals, which can take years for VA to adjudicate. For elderly veterans, or veterans struggling with serious medical or financial problems, the years spent waiting for the VA to process their initial appeals impose enormous hardship, students from the clinic said.

“It’s frustrating to be stuck in limbo. It has been nearly two years since I began my initial appeal by filing a Notice of Disagreement and electing a Decision Review Officer hearing in July 2013, and the VA has still not decided my case,” said Conley Monk, the Vietnam combat veteran who is filing the lawsuit. “While waiting on the VA, my house burned down, and I’ve had significant medical problems, including a botched VA surgery. It’s been hard to make ends meet to get treated for my diabetes and PTSD.”

“I strongly support action to reform this broken appeals system because justice delayed for these veterans is justice denied, unconscionably and unacceptably,” explained Senator Blumenthal (D-CT), ranking member on the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs. “I hear from hundreds of veterans whose benefit appeals have languished for months, even years. The VA needs to improve and enhance its processing of appeals from denial of critical benefit applications. I support more resources and additional staff who will expedite these benefit applications and appeals.”

“Mr. Monk brings this suit for himself and thousands of other veterans pursuing an initial appeal who do not have the resources to file a federal lawsuit to compel the VA to act,” said Julia Shu ’16, a law student intern in the Clinic. “The only legal option for a veteran whose initial appeal languishes in the VA system is expensive and time-consuming. Each veteran must retain legal counsel and apply individually to CAVC to request a court order that the VA decide his or her case. System-wide delays persist when the CAVC does not resolve an issue for all affected veterans in one decision.”

“This lawsuit is novel because judges of the Court have repeatedly recognized their power to adjudicate a class action-type case, but in the history of the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims, they have yet to do so,” said Will Hudson ’17, also a law student intern. “This is an appropriate case to recognize the first collective action and to bring relief to these veterans who should not be expected to wait any longer.”

The plaintiffs in this case are represented by law student interns William Hudson and Julia Shu, and supervising attorney Michael Wishnie of the Veterans Legal Services Clinic at Yale Law School. The clinic, founded in the fall of 2010, represents individual veterans and veterans’ organizations on a range of matters. It is one of a small number of clinics in the country dedicated solely to serving veterans and their organizations.

Healing Through Humor: Laughter Therapy is an Effective Pain Reducer

April 6th, 2015 by Darisse Smith

If you are a pain sufferer like me, having a good laugh isn’t always easy. But it sure can make you feel better.

Recently, I gave a presentation about Laughter Therapy for the North Carolina Therapeutic Recreation Association.  In preparing for the presentation, I had to think a lot about how I have survived the daily toil of chronic pain. I have had some form of pain in my back and left leg since February 2005. Experiencing pain for a long time is just a small part of the battle, though it is enough to drive a person to sadness, insanity and mild violence. For me (and probably for many of you), the greatest source of bitterness is that with the proper medical treatment at the time of injury I could be pain free. Instead, doctors dismissed my complaints and then grossly mistreated my injury. If they had just taken me seriously from the beginning and listened, I would most likely have had months of discomfort instead of years.

I figured something out recently—holding onto to that bitterness was actually hurting me–bringing me down mentally and providing excuses for me to remain severely unhappy. So I decided to remember what I already knew—it’s good to laugh.

In 2011, I was chosen to take part in a program and documentary film called, “Comedy Warriors: Healing Through Humor.” 5 disabled combat veterans were chosen to learn how to write and perform stand up comedy with the help of “A” list celebrities Bob Saget, Lewis Black, Zach Galifianakis and BJ Novak. We were also paired up with other comedy mentors who worked very closely with us to develop a 5 minute stand up set. My mentor was Bernadette Luckette, a comic with 10 years experience performing stand up and success as a writer on “The Tracy Morgan Show,” “Livin’ Single,” and “Girlfriends,” among others. She taught me exactly how powerful laughter can be. She encouraged me to write jokes about the parts of my recovery that really ticked me off, especially the gross negligence of my doctors. It was during “Comedy Warriors” that I realized how I have used my sense of humor throughout my time as a pain patient to survive. I binge-watched sitcoms during my lowest times. I cracked jokes at the Pain Management Doctor even though I was inwardly miserable.

LAUGHTER IS THE BEST MEDICINE

In doing research for this presentation I discovered the physiological and psychological reasons that laughter really is the best medicine. In 1964, world-renowned journalist and peace advocate Norman Cousins was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis, a degenerative and debilitating disease of the spine. Doctors told him that he would die very soon from the disease and offered little hope for regaining any ability to move freely. Fortunately, Cousins did not accept this grim diagnosis. He checked himself into a hotel and rented hours worth of comedic movies including the “Marx Brothers” and episodes of “Candid Camera.” Cousins discovered that an extended period of rigorous belly laughter relaxed him enough that he could sleep, allowing his body to heal.

Eventually, Cousins recovered from his illness and lived another 26 years. More important than that, he also became the modern champion of a field called gelotology: the science and study of the physiological and psychological effects of laughter. Did you know that smiling for 20 seconds cools the blood to your brain, creating positive emotions? In the opposing corner, frowning for 20 seconds warms the blood to your brain, creating negative emotions. Laughter has been proven to relax muscles, produce endorphins, boost immunity, lower stress hormones, prevent heart disease and even decrease pain.

I acknowledge that laughter is not the miracle panacea we all wish for but it is a normal human experience that we can use to our distinct advantage. Try a laughter yoga class (which is the subject for a whole another column!). Rent movies and shows that make you laugh. Force a smile for 20 seconds when you are feeling sad, frustrated or angry.

Add laughter to your kit box of tactics in reducing pain, boosting your mental outlook and staying healthy.

Let the healing begin!

Editor’s Note—Darisse Smith is a US Army veteran and a chronic pain sufferer who occasionally writes for the National Pain Report. Laughter works for her. What works for you?

Bill aims to help veterans heal with farming

By Nicky Hickling
By Jillian Marshall

 

February 4, 2015Updated Feb 4, 2015 at 7:40 PM EST

(WBNG Binghamton) U.S. Dept. of Agriculture funds will allow Cornell University to increase training and resources for returning veterans seeking to start farm-related careers.

On Monday, U.S. Sens. Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand announced the USDA will provide $1.4 million in federal funds to help two New York state organizations train farmers and ranchers, including returning veterans looking to start farm-related careers.

 

These federal funds will be allocated through the USDA’s Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP).

Cornell University in Ithaca will receive $712,500 in federal funds to provide advanced training and support to 500 advanced beginning farmers and 100 military veterans who are seeking to start careers in farming.

“Veterans are really one of the groups in our community that is growing and when it comes to job reentry and training, sometimes agriculture is really being pushed to the side,” said Laura Biasillo, of Cornell Cooperative Extension.

Though the funding is going to Cornell University, each local extension, including the one on Front Street, will be able to participate.

Once the program gets off the ground, it will be individualized to each veteran.

“Some of them may be interested in becoming a manager, becoming an owner of their own farm, or maybe are interested in just working on a farm,” Biasillo said.

The Binghamton Vet Center said getting veterans of combat and war into agriculture can be healing because it allows the veteran to create something and nurture it.

“The peace and tranquility that agriculture provides in nurturing something and seeing that go to full production is a welcomed peace for veterans to be involved in,” said president of the Farmers and Veterans Coalition and president of the Chenango County Farm Bureau Bradd Vickers.

Vickers added many veterans come from rural areas, like Chenango County, and need help transitioning back into society.

“Many of them have the experience that they were trained for in the military — they just need the mentoring to help them take that experience and put it into agriculture,” Vickers said.

But it doesn’t come without any complications — the current G.I. Bill benefits can’t be used for agricultural training programs.

“One of the things we’re going to be working on through this grant, and Cornell University, is to be crafting agricultural training opportunities that will be acceptable to be used with the G.I. Bill benefits,” Biasillo said.

Schumer and Gillibrand previously pushed to ensure the USDA had the funding necessary to deliver these kinds of training programs to thousands of Upstate New York veterans and farmers.

“With two great Ithaca organizations now ready to provide the training in agriculture that veterans need to break into the industry, it will only be a benefit to local veterans and farmers.” said Schumer.

Cornell aims to enhance the resources and training available to military veterans interested in farming by teaming up with established veterans groups to create programs that better link veterans to agricultural opportunities and provide the necessary training.

In 2009, Cornell successfully instituted the NBFP, a learning network that delivers mentoring, training and program development resources for beginning farmers in the Northeast.

The Center for Transformative Action in Ithaca will receive $707,727 in federal funds to provide comprehensive training and mentoring to beginning farmers and ranchers in the Finger Lakes Region of New York.

More than 80 beginning farmer service organizations participate in their professional development network, improving their own skills and accessing new resources to serve beginning farmers.

The BFRDP program, first established by the 2008 Farm Bill, aims to support those who have farmed or ranched for less than 10 years with workshops, educational teams, training and technical assistance throughout the country.

NIFA awards grants to organizations that implement programs to train beginning farmers and ranchers. Monday’s announcement was funded by the 2014 Farm Bill, which continued authorization of this program.

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NCCIH working group recommends large-scale collaborative research into pain management

Proposed research to focus on nondrug approaches to help active military and veterans

The feasibility of conducting larger-scale research studies on nondrug approaches for pain management in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) should be assessed by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This recommendation was delivered in a report by a working group of the Center’s Advisory Council.

“The high rates of chronic pain in the military and veteran populations are alarming.”

Lloyd Michener, M.D.
Professor and chair, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Chair of the working group.

“Chronic pain is a major public health problem that affects more than 100 million Americans, and research shows that it may disproportionately affect military personnel and veterans,” said Lloyd Michener, M.D., professor and chair, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; chair of the working group. “The high rates of chronic pain in the military and veteran populations are alarming. New strategies for managing this widespread condition are urgently needed.”

Read More: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/feb2015/nccih-11.htm

 

Veterans experience positive results from weekly yoga class

By Gary Demuth

The Salina Journal, Kan.

Published: October 13, 2014Paul Hand never dreamed a yoga class could change his life so dramatically. The breathing exercises, stretching and movement in his weekly yoga class have helped the 51-year-old Salina man lower his blood pressure, increase his flexibility, decrease his joint pain and perhaps most importantly, ease his post-traumatic stress disorder.

 

Read More: http://www.stripes.com/news/us/veterans-experience-positive-results-from-weekly-yoga-class

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Complementary and alternative medicine for veterans and military personnel

A growing body of research evidence shows that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has health benefits for US military veterans and active duty personnel, according to a special December supplement to Medical Care.

The special issue presents new studies and commentaries on the benefits and increasing use of CAM techniques in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and other military health settings. “The papers in this supplement represent promising steps to improve the health of veterans and active military personnel,” according to an introductory article by Guest Editors Stephanie L. Taylor, PhD, of Greater Los Angeles VA Healthcare System and A. Rani Elwy, PhD, of Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Bedford, Mass. “They mirror the countless stories we hear from veterans and their providers about the positive effect that CAM is having on their lives.”

Read More: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-11-complementary-alternative-medicine-veterans-military.html

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Veteran’s Day Event Features Inspiring Story – Benefits Disabled Veterans

Pictured is Travis Mills (left), who is featured in the documentary playing November 11, 2014 and event organizer Ricardo Fernandez. (Posted by Tim Howe, Community Contributor)

On Tuesday November 11, 2014, a special screening of the award winning documentary Travis: A Soldier’s Story will be shown at the Beverly Arts Center (2407 W. 111th Street, Chicago, IL 60655) Travis is one of five surviving quadruple amputees from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan whose recovery and efforts to help other veterans is truly an inspiration. All proceeds will go to The Travis Mills Foundation which supports disabled veterans and their families. Travis’ foundation is raising funds to build a fully accessible camp in Maine for disabled veterans and their families. There is no charge for Active Military or Veterans, $10 for General Admission and $5 for students.

Ricardo Fernandez, a local physical therapist from Orland Park, met Travis Mills in April, 2014. Ricardo supports many local veteran organizations and was immediately inspired by Travis’ positive attitude, determination and passion to support our veterans. Ricardo and his team are leading the Chicago fundraising efforts to support the Travis Mills Foundation in their goal to build a camp for disabled veterans and their families.

In addition to an awe inspiring movie, there will be raffle baskets, a silent auction, and door prizes, with thousands of dollars in prizes including Chicago Blackhawks tickets, a 46-inch Samsung TV, Michael Jordan and other Chicago sports memorabilia, restaurant certificates, and patriotic gift baskets. The doors will open at 6pm and Stephanie Escamilla, a Hometown resident, will sing the Star Spangled Banner to kick off the event at 7pm. The movie will start at 7:15pm and last 1 hour. The event will end at 9pm after the raffle basket drawing.

Guests who would like to bring and donate items to be sent to our Troops still serving are encouraged to do so. Some of the items needed include batteries, beef jerky, hand sanitizer, hand/foot warmers, small boxes of hot chocolate, single serving soups, pre-packaged cookies, lip balm and hand lotion.

For more information regarding Travis Mills and the Travis Mills Foundation, please visit www.travismills.org. For ticket information, please contact Ricardo at fernandez23@usa.net or by calling (708) 341-2357.

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New DEA Rules for Hydrocodone Combination Medications

After October 3, 2014, many Veterans may notice VA prescription changes for hydrocodone combination (HC) medications. It’s important to know how these rule changes affect your HC prescription when using My HealtheVet.Brand names for HCs include AZDONE, LORCET, LORTAB, IBUDONE, TUSSIONEX or VICODIN. VA prescription bottles will typically list HYDROCODONE and another medicine such as ACETAMINOPHEN. These medicines may be used to relieve pain or to reduce coughing.The change comes from the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). The new rule changes HC medicines from a Schedule III drug to a Schedule II drug. They will now be more strictly controlled. The DEA did this because these medications were found to be highly abused, habit forming and potentially deadly in overdoses. These stricter regulations should improve their safe use for everyone.From <https://www.myhealth.va.gov/mhv-portal-web/anonymous.portal;MHV_JSESSIONID=qr4cJ1nNymTcLGn0gsv81nnpqttTLWn1HdLwRQhPhRbxcVP3ZGgv!900691386?_nfpb=true&_nfto=false&_pageLabel=spotlightArchive&contentPage=spotlight/September2014/DEA%20Rules%20for%20Hydrocodone.html>

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Bill to enhance care for veterans with brain injuries clears House By Ripon Advance Reports  |  September 19, 2014

 Veterans would have access to better treatment for traumatic brain injuries under legislation approved on Wednesday by the House of Representatives.

Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) introduced the Veterans Brain Injury Care Improvement Act to improve services and increase reporting requirements.

“We always pray that our veterans return home in good health and good spirits,” Cassidy said. “If they do not, it is our duty to provide these men and women with the proper care they need. For those suffering from traumatic brain injury, we can help them by enhancing a treatment program with proven results. Ensuring our veterans have access to quality treatment options is a priority.”

From <http://riponadvance.com/news/bill-enhance-care-veterans-brain-injuries-clears-house/9048>

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Bill aims to help veterans heal with farming

By Nicky Hickling
By Jillian Marshall

 

February 4, 2015Updated Feb 4, 2015 at 7:40 PM EST

(WBNG Binghamton) U.S. Dept. of Agriculture funds will allow Cornell University to increase training and resources for returning veterans seeking to start farm-related careers.

On Monday, U.S. Sens. Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand announced the USDA will provide $1.4 million in federal funds to help two New York state organizations train farmers and ranchers, including returning veterans looking to start farm-related careers.

 

These federal funds will be allocated through the USDA’s Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP).

Cornell University in Ithaca will receive $712,500 in federal funds to provide advanced training and support to 500 advanced beginning farmers and 100 military veterans who are seeking to start careers in farming.

“Veterans are really one of the groups in our community that is growing and when it comes to job reentry and training, sometimes agriculture is really being pushed to the side,” said Laura Biasillo, of Cornell Cooperative Extension.

Though the funding is going to Cornell University, each local extension, including the one on Front Street, will be able to participate.

Once the program gets off the ground, it will be individualized to each veteran.

“Some of them may be interested in becoming a manager, becoming an owner of their own farm, or maybe are interested in just working on a farm,” Biasillo said.

The Binghamton Vet Center said getting veterans of combat and war into agriculture can be healing because it allows the veteran to create something and nurture it.

“The peace and tranquility that agriculture provides in nurturing something and seeing that go to full production is a welcomed peace for veterans to be involved in,” said president of the Farmers and Veterans Coalition and president of the Chenango County Farm Bureau Bradd Vickers.

Vickers added many veterans come from rural areas, like Chenango County, and need help transitioning back into society.

“Many of them have the experience that they were trained for in the military — they just need the mentoring to help them take that experience and put it into agriculture,” Vickers said.

But it doesn’t come without any complications — the current G.I. Bill benefits can’t be used for agricultural training programs.

“One of the things we’re going to be working on through this grant, and Cornell University, is to be crafting agricultural training opportunities that will be acceptable to be used with the G.I. Bill benefits,” Biasillo said.

Schumer and Gillibrand previously pushed to ensure the USDA had the funding necessary to deliver these kinds of training programs to thousands of Upstate New York veterans and farmers.

“With two great Ithaca organizations now ready to provide the training in agriculture that veterans need to break into the industry, it will only be a benefit to local veterans and farmers.” said Schumer.

Cornell aims to enhance the resources and training available to military veterans interested in farming by teaming up with established veterans groups to create programs that better link veterans to agricultural opportunities and provide the necessary training.

In 2009, Cornell successfully instituted the NBFP, a learning network that delivers mentoring, training and program development resources for beginning farmers in the Northeast.

The Center for Transformative Action in Ithaca will receive $707,727 in federal funds to provide comprehensive training and mentoring to beginning farmers and ranchers in the Finger Lakes Region of New York.

More than 80 beginning farmer service organizations participate in their professional development network, improving their own skills and accessing new resources to serve beginning farmers.

The BFRDP program, first established by the 2008 Farm Bill, aims to support those who have farmed or ranched for less than 10 years with workshops, educational teams, training and technical assistance throughout the country.

NIFA awards grants to organizations that implement programs to train beginning farmers and ranchers. Monday’s announcement was funded by the 2014 Farm Bill, which continued authorization of this program.

 

 

 

NCCIH working group recommends large-scale collaborative research into pain management

Proposed research to focus on nondrug approaches to help active military and veterans

The feasibility of conducting larger-scale research studies on nondrug approaches for pain management in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) should be assessed by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This recommendation was delivered in a report by a working group of the Center’s Advisory Council.

“The high rates of chronic pain in the military and veteran populations are alarming.”

Lloyd Michener, M.D.
Professor and chair, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Chair of the working group.

“Chronic pain is a major public health problem that affects more than 100 million Americans, and research shows that it may disproportionately affect military personnel and veterans,” said Lloyd Michener, M.D., professor and chair, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; chair of the working group. “The high rates of chronic pain in the military and veteran populations are alarming. New strategies for managing this widespread condition are urgently needed.”

Read More: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/feb2015/nccih-11.htm